kagablog

November 8, 2017

The Darling Buds of May

Filed under: literature — ABRAXAS @ 1:08 pm

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October 31, 2017

The Sacred Conspiracy

Filed under: acéphale,Georges Bataille — ABRAXAS @ 2:16 pm

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Matthew Pateman on Aryan Kaganof’s Acinema and the limits of Lyotard’s cinematic writing

Filed under: kaganof,Matthew Pateman — ABRAXAS @ 1:58 pm

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first published here: https://patemanponders.blogspot.co.za/2017/08/aryan-kaganofs-acinema-and-limits-of.html

October 30, 2017

Metalepsis in Black reviewed by Finn Daniels-Yeoman

Filed under: 2016 - Metalepsis in Black — ABRAXAS @ 10:53 pm

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first published here: https://www.africa-in-motion.org.uk/blog/tentative-thoughts-on-metalepsis-in-black-by-finn-daniels-yeomans/
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October 29, 2017

Eoan Group – Ronnie Theys movie coming

Filed under: 2013 - An Inconsolable Memory — ABRAXAS @ 5:20 pm

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first published here: https://www.iol.co.za/weekend-argus/lifestyle/son-celebrates-father-with-lauded-script-11761222

THE INFLUENCE OF EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION ON AFRICANS By Silas Modiri Molema, 1919

Filed under: race — ABRAXAS @ 5:14 pm

The tribal collectivism of the Bantu, with its beliefs, its superstitions, customs, and traditions, was a safeguard to the morals of the people. Partial civilisation means dislocation, the dawn of individualism, and a shattering of ancient beliefs and superstitions. They are shattered but not replaced by any new beliefs. Customs and traditions are despised and rejected, but no new customs and traditions are acquired, or can be acquired. The new individual is a spiritual and moral void.

Outwardly, indeed, he may don a civilised appearance—European clothing, European language, European ideas, European manners, and live in European houses. Nay,some even sink their native names and adopt European names, and some, without knowing European languages, forget, or pretend to forget, their mother tongue—that last index of identity.

They lose all trace of national pride, and are cut clean adrift from tribal moorings. And what is the reason for all this ? The metamorphosing Bantu themselves don’t know and don’t care. Hardly on the threshold of civilisation, they consider themselves already changed beings—and changed indeed they are, but only for the worse. Copying form for fact, and substituting shadow for substance, understanding nothing,but mimicking all the time, such people are an utter void, and they sufier for it—both morally and physically—for neglecting their tribal lore, with its beneficial influences and its drawbacks.

But what is more, the loitering on the outskirts of civilisation does not act deleteriously only in the passive or negative way of unlearning the national lore. It also acts actively or positively. Civilisation comes with its vices—drink and immoralities, with their long train of suffering.

It seems it should be the business of the more advanced Bantu to study, uphold, and propagate their national customs and institutions, only modifying or abolishing such as are pernicious, and seem calculated to clash with the best in civilisation, and to arrest progress ; smoothing those that are jagged, recasting and refining such as are rough and uncouth.

It should be their concern to learn first to look upon life through their own national spectacles and then, but not till then, through foreign spectacles, to inculcate into their less advanced brethren the respect and esteem of Bantu usages while emphasizing only the laudable practices in the new civilisation.

Then, perhaps, there will be fewer in that hopeless sect, who, wandering far from home and coming under changed environment, purposely forget their nationality, its ethics and its usages, without the possibility of their becoming of another nationality, nor of thoroughly appreciating foreign ethics and usages ; who with no more than a nodding acquaintance with foreign—to wit, European—languages, pretend not to know their mother tongue, who, imagining themselves educated, scorn and despise their national traditions, imbibe a dangerous scepticism and materialism easily found in commercial and industrial centres, absorb all the shortcomings of civilisation and miss all the good in it, and are, at the end, infinitely worse than they were in their raw, uncivilised state—a floating mass of humanity, without identity, without creed, and without character.

The raw, untouched, unsophisticated, purely uncivilised, but none the less observant, self-respecting, often virtuous, and always healthier and happier Bantu, seeing their half-civilised and demi-semi-oivilised brethren get drunk, get into trouble, get into prison, and get even to the gallows, and generally deteriorating, these raw, totally uncivilised tribal Bantu look down upon their half-civilised and detribalised fellow-countrymen, and deploring their degeneracy, also despise that strange force which has so unmanned them. They call them Ama-Kumsha or MaKgomocha ; that is, litterally—speakers of European languages, a word which, however, in the mind of a tribal Muntu, is always associated with something of deceit, and is almost synonymous with that meaning turn-coat, cheat, or trickster.

BANTU – PAST & PRESENT: By Silas Modiri Molema, 1919

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October 27, 2017

Filed under: caelan,kagaportraits — ABRAXAS @ 10:22 am

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Filed under: Boarding Pass — ABRAXAS @ 10:20 am

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Filed under: caelan — ABRAXAS @ 10:16 am

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October 16, 2017

Filed under: dick tuinder — ABRAXAS @ 6:53 am

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Metalepsis in Black – uk premiere monday 30 october

Filed under: 2016 - Metalepsis in Black — ABRAXAS @ 6:42 am

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first published here: https://www.gla.ac.uk/events/films/?webapp=events&action=details&id=10658
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September 27, 2017

snakes

Filed under: kaganof,music — ABRAXAS @ 4:34 am

“If music affects snakes, it is not on account of the spiritual notions it offers them, but because snakes are long and coil their length upon the earth, because their bodies touch the earth at almost every point; and because the musical vibrations which are communicated to the earth affect them like a very subtle, very long massage.”
Antonin Artaud

September 25, 2017

“Damage to Property” vs. “Fallism”

Filed under: 2016 - Metalepsis in Black — ABRAXAS @ 10:29 am

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first published here: https://thefreeblack.wordpress.com/2016/05/20/damage-to-property-v-fallism-the-hypocrisy-within-the-movement/

on writing the novel

Filed under: literature — ABRAXAS @ 9:08 am

If the language we have inherited, have had imposed upon us, proves unfit to our purpose in catching hold of the darting apparition of our dream book (as it always will, for the job is impossible), then we must reinvent it. The writing of every novel requires this act of invention, the creation of a personal Volapük. For each book you must devise an idiolect, a working creole you compound by embedding the fine-grained matrix of your mother tongue with the coarse aggregate of the world—a Yiddish-speaking Alaskan Jerusalem, a four-color Nazi-haunted Metropolis, a nighttown Pittsburgh of gangsters and gay boys—that you have dreamed, with its argots and geographies, ethnologies and etiquettes. The limits of language are not the stopping point, they are the point at which we must begin to tell the tale.
Michael Chabon

The Inheritance

Filed under: philosophy — ABRAXAS @ 9:05 am

“What is inherited from others can be nothing but egg shells. We should treat the fact of their presence with indulgence, but they will not give us spiritual nourishment”

Ludwig Wittgenstein

La séquence des barres parallèles (dir. Aryan Kaganof, 1992)

Filed under: kaganof short films,kerkhof short films — ABRAXAS @ 8:59 am

September 20, 2017

Greyton, wednesday 20 September 2017, 10:14am

Filed under: Greyton 7233 — ABRAXAS @ 2:23 pm

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Giuliano Vivaldi reviews Jack Sargeant’s Flesh and Excess

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first published here: http://sensesofcinema.com/2017/book-reviews/flesh-and-excess/

Filed under: kaganof — ABRAXAS @ 12:19 pm

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Filed under: art — ABRAXAS @ 12:17 pm

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Jethro Louw – troebadour

Filed under: jethro louw,kagaportraits — ABRAXAS @ 12:00 pm

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Filed under: art,dick tuinder — ABRAXAS @ 11:27 am

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Kamvelihle Goba on Metalepsis in Black

Filed under: 2016 - Metalepsis in Black,Tshepo Goba — ABRAXAS @ 11:24 am

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September 19, 2017

Paul Beatty on closure

Filed under: literature,race — ABRAXAS @ 11:48 am

“I’d love to say that I awoke from my own fugue state and remembered only the stinging fizz of my wounds as Hominy gently dabbed at my police-inflicted abrasions with cotton balls soaked in hydrogen peroxide. But as long as I live, I’ll never forget the sound of my leather belt against the Levi Strauss denim as I unsheathed it from my pants. The whistle of that brown-and-black reversible whip cutting through the air and raining down hard in loud skin-popping thunderclaps on Hominy’s back. The teary-eyed joy and the thankfulness he showed me as he crawled, not away from the beating, but into it; seeking closure for centuries of repressed anger and decades of unrequited subservience by hugging me at the knees and begging me to hit him harder, his black body welcoming the weight and sizzle of my whip with groveling groans of ecstasy. I’ll never forget Hominy bleeding in the street and, like every slave throughout history, refusing to press charges. I’ll never forget him walking me gently inside and asking those who’d gathered around not to judge me because, after all, who whispers in the Nigger Whisperer’s ear?
:Hominy.”
“Yes, massa.”
“What would you whisper in my ear?”
“I’d whisper that you’re thinking too small. That saving Dickens nigger by nigger with a bullhorn ain’t never going to work. That you have to think bigger than your father did. You know the phrase “You can’t see the forest for the trees?”
“Of course.”
“Well, you have to stop seeing us as individuals, ’cause right now, massa, you ain’t seeing the plantation for the niggers.”

The Sellout
page 79-80

Paul Beatty on The Slave

Filed under: literature,race — ABRAXAS @ 11:36 am

“Hominy, you’re not a slave and I’m definitely not your master.”
“Massa,” he said, the smile evaporating from his face, and shaking his head in that pitiable way people who you think you’re better than do when you they catch you thinking that you’re better than them, “sometimes we just have to accept who we are and act accordingly. I’m a slave. That’s who I am. It’s the role I was born to play. A slave who just also happens to be an actor. But being black ain’t method acting. Lee Strasberg could teach you how to be a tree, but he couldn’t teach you how to be a nigger. This is the ultimate nexus between craft and purpose, and we won’t be discussing this again. I’m your nigger for life, and that’s it.”

The Sellout
page 77

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